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Wet sanding question??

 
JSwartz13
New User
Posts: 12
Joined: 04/12
Posted: 04/23/12 11:37 AM

Hello,

I have a question regarding wet sanding. I tried to wet sand my car, and for the most part it looked really good, however I messed up and used 800 grit paper and then went to a 2000 grit. I have very fine scratches in my clear coat, mind you I have a lot left as I watch the painter spray a whole gallon on my car mainly roof and hood.
My question is should I go over the clear with 1500 then 2000 and then finish with M101 cutting cream to remove the marks?  

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idrivejunk
New User
Posts: 2
Joined: 04/12
Posted: 04/24/12 03:23 AM

The answer is yes. But you may want to try a different compound and pad if the M101 isn't working for you.  
idrivejunk

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pepsi1
User
Posts: 94
Joined: 10/11
Posted: 04/24/12 06:54 AM

Just a little didi to add give it some time some to harden and set-up.Even if you use 2000 you will put scratches in it you won't get out....  

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JSwartz13
New User
Posts: 12
Joined: 04/12
Posted: 04/24/12 01:40 PM

My clear coat has been on the car for about a year now. When I did the wet sending it was about 4 months after the job. I have not tried the compound as of yet but will do so when it gets warmer.  

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JSwartz13
New User
Posts: 12
Joined: 04/12
Posted: 05/03/12 05:25 PM

This appears to be a hologram of some sorts with very fine marks from wet sanding. Please advise on correct method on removing marks....  

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idrivejunk
New User
Posts: 2
Joined: 04/12
Posted: 05/05/12 06:16 AM

Hologram?  Confused

In my opinion, leveling (sanding and buffing) and polishing should be done no later than one week after the clearcoat is sprayed. I prefer to do it the next day (no later than a week, although thicker applications stay soft longer), while the masking is still in place and the paint buffs as easily as a warm stick of butter. In catalyzed finishes, chemical crosslinking (curing) occurs over time, and some clears can become so hard that it is virtually impossible to get all the sandscratches out. At that point, your only alternative is to use a more agressive (harsher, more abrasive) compound. This is where you are now. In this case you will be able to sand away the marks, but not able to polish the finish to a haze-free condition. Especially if using only one product. Not being able to see it, thats about all I can tell you. Try 3M super Duty Rubbing Compound with a white wool pad to remove the sanding marks and then use a finer polish or polishes on foam polishing pads to bring the shine back.

A short lesson to maybe help in the future-

Long ago, buffing and polishing were accomplished using abrasive compound and polish. Meaning that it actually takes away paint to level the surface. Modern products do not remove the paint, instead they melt the top of the surface and smear it smooth. This is often referred to as "chemical cut", and prior sanding is often taken to the 3000 grit level before buffing. Once the paint has fully cured, these type products lose their effect and you are left with the abrasive approach, which is the 3M Super Duty stuff I mentioned. Its old school.  
idrivejunk

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