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Starting a car that sat for 27 Years

 
WPlayer
User
Posts: 101
Joined: 10/08
Posted: 10/01/08 12:13 PM

I recently picked up a '69 Mustang Grande that has sat in a garage for 27 years.  I would like to get it started.  What would you do first?  I'm thinking of replacing:

Engine Oil
Tranny Fluid (not sure where to drain it)
Coolant
Plugs & Wires
Fuel Filter maybe (haven't found it yet)

Still trying to find my way around the car.

What would you suggest?

Thanks,
-Will  

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jlg2002
Guru
Posts: 1410
Joined: 03/08
Posted: 10/01/08 01:51 PM

Get yourself a Mustang book and a factory service manual and read up on where everything is and familarize yourself to the car. There are couple of good guides on the market. National Parts Depot is a good source for parts

After 27 years, all fluids must be changed(including brake). Take the plugs out and spray some kind of lubrication (like 3-1 oil) into the holes, let it set for 5-10 minutes. Crank the engine by hand to spread the lubrication onto the cylinder walls. repeat the oil into the plug holes again and hand crank.  Take the dist out and spin the oil pump until you get pressure (you may have to drop the pan to reprime the oil pump), rebuild the carb, replace the fuel filter (it should be attached to the carb) flush the fuel lines from the tank, clean the tank. don't forget to drain the trans torque coverter and rear end oil. Points and cond probably need replaced. Heater and radiator hoses, belts.  

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WPlayer
User
Posts: 101
Joined: 10/08
Posted: 10/01/08 03:45 PM

Thanks for the guidance, I appreciate it.

Any particular types of fluids/parts you would recommend, or just go to the local parts store?

I was under the car and didn't see where to drain the torque converter or rear end, I'll have to look into that.

How would you recommend cleaning the tank and lines?  The tank sounds empty when I tap on it.  Do you think the fuel pump would still be any good?

So the oil pump can be accessed by removing the distributor?

If I have to drop the pan, how would I go about priming the oil pump, and would you recommend liquid gasket on the pan?

Thanks again!
-Will
PS What kind of Mustang do you have?  

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eric.bower
New User
Posts: 4
Joined: 05/08
Posted: 10/02/08 06:41 AM

Don't forget to replace the flexible portion of the brake lines and the wheel cylinders when you change out the brake fluid.  Stopping is just about as important as starting!
Good luck with your efforts.  

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jlg2002
Guru
Posts: 1410
Joined: 03/08
Posted: 10/02/08 01:29 PM

Will,
Please don't take this the wrong way but if you don't know where some of these things are you need a mentor (or at a minimum, the FSM I previously suggested) there with you to help guide you.

Use high quality fluids. I personally like Castrol products. Some folks recommend Rotella oil since its got higher phosphorus/zinc in it (better for older engines so the experts say). I'm not wholey convinced on the issue yet one way or another.
The TC drain is on the front of the TC and you remove the plate from the trans housing to get at it.
Flush the lines with a petrolem based product like gas, paint thinner, acetone, or laquer thinner. Same for the fuel tank put something in it and swish it around, drain it. I recall that there is some fuel tank cleaner kits on the market (you'll have to google for it)
Regarding the FP- I would probaly change it as a precaution since its been many years since its been wet by fuel (a leaking diaphram is a bad thing for the engine- dilutes the oil and may cause an explosion.)
The oil pump input shaft is accessed by removing the dist. You will need a special adapter that mount in a drill to turn it.
I only use Fel-pro gaskets on my engines.(and silicone on the corners.  

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soaring3
Enthusiast
Posts: 440
Joined: 03/08
Posted: 10/02/08 04:08 PM

Your most critical concern is that the engine is not seized.  Take out all the plugs and pour in some type of lubricant in each piston hole.  Take a 13/15" socket and breaker bar and turn the engine over several times. If it turns over, take the carburetor off and overhaul it.  The gas that was left in it 27 years ago is varnish.  From there, you just need to start it and time it once running.  That is to assume that the plugs, plug wires and other rubber items haven't been chewed up by rats. If it doesn't start with a fresh tank of gas, then remove the fuel pump and replace it.  Also take out the fuel sending unit and see if the "sock" filter is plugged with rust particles.  Fresh fuel, a good spark to the plugs and compression equals a running enginel.  
soaring3

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WPlayer
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Posts: 101
Joined: 10/08
Posted: 10/12/08 10:17 PM

I appreciate the information.  I've been doing a lot of reading and research.  A lot of people are practically calling me stupid if I don't replace the fuel tank and lines.  What's your guys' take on it?  

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Bill T.
Enthusiast
Posts: 283
Joined: 04/08
Posted: 10/13/08 07:53 AM

If the fuel line isn't rusted or clogged beyond flowing enough, leave the replacement for later.  You should at least take the tank out, pull the sending unit/fuel pickup out, and clean and thoroughly inspect everything.  Fuel leaks suck.  
Bill

1966 coupe
1995 Cobra R

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jlg2002
Guru
Posts: 1410
Joined: 03/08
Posted: 10/13/08 01:19 PM

Unless there is a mitigating reason, like rust, there's no reason to replace lines or tanks.  It's not a bad option though if it's economically available to you. You may want to replace the tank sending unit with new since it's the most likely to experience problems due to long term storage with fuel in the tank.  

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Toms65stang
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Posts: 222
Joined: 04/08
Posted: 10/13/08 03:27 PM

THE ONLY STUPID QUESTIONS IS THE ONES NOT ASKED  

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soaring3
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Posts: 440
Joined: 03/08
Posted: 10/13/08 05:15 PM

It depends on the amount of fuel left in the tank to determine if the tank should be replaced.  If it was full then most likely that fuel turned to varnish, but the rust inside the tank is minimal.  If the fuel level was somewhat below full, the I would expect the rust to be beyond repairing, and a new tank is in order.  At any rate, the fuel needs to be replaced.  The lines are also FUBAR, so just to keep from coming back on here and asking us for a reason why the gas filter is always getting plugged with rust particles, go ahead and replace the gas lines.  I would overhaul the carb as well.  
soaring3

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WPlayer
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Posts: 101
Joined: 10/08
Posted: 10/18/08 01:13 AM

Thanks guys!

Are the lines on a '69 coupe 3/8 or 5/16?

Also, I have the valve covers off, is there anything that I should check for while they're off?  The piece that pushes down the valves are all firm up-and-own, some have some movement side-to-side.  I figure that just has to do with the position of the valves.  

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